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Blog Posts tagged "Children"

This post originally appeared on the Center for Children and Families' Children's Health Policy Blog.

This week, Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families and The Children’s Partnership released a new paper outlining how to get ready for big coverage opportunities in California. It highlights opportunities that will provide coverage to more than a million people in California’s immigrant families when immigration relief takes effect.

But as spelled out in the paper, Immigration Relief for Parents and Youth = Whole Family Health Coverage in California, while we wait for some of the immigration relief-related coverage options in California to become available, there is a lot that advocates and community organizations can do right now to cover eligible children and youth in immigrant families. Here is the rundown of coverage opportunities “now playing” in California and also “coming soon” that could get many more children, youth, and parents in immigrant families covered.

Now Playing: More than 400,000 children in immigrant families are already eligible for full scope or state-funded Medi-Cal but are not yet enrolled. It is not too soon to roll up our sleeves and get to work on covering them. Here’s the breakdown:

This originally appeared on the California Budget & Policy Center's site. It is important to remember these health programs as we await the release of Governor Jerry Brown's revised budget proposal tomorrow.

Ensuring the health and wellbeing of children is fundamental to supporting families and strengthening communities across California. Public investment and related public policies can play a central role in keeping children and their families healthy. This is especially important for children living in poverty, who are more likely than other children to face short- and long-term health challenges.

Children’s Health Programs in California: Promoting a Lifetime of Health and Well-Being looks at our state’s health care system for children and their families, including both public health care coverage and public health programs. This report shows the size and scope of these programs, who they benefit, and the services they provide. In addition, this report highlights some of the key opportunities and challenges California now faces in promoting children’s health in the wake of the Great Recession and with the implementation of federal health care reform.

Children’s Health Programs in California: Recent Years’ Budget and Policy Changes – a brief companion piece to the main publication – provides a timeline of major policy choices made in the past several years that have shaped our state’s health system for children.

A few weeks back, we had a great post from California Food Policy Advocates (CFPA) on the Child and Adult Care Food Program’s (CACFP) updated nutrition standards. It included a lot of great background information on the program and details about the current update process:

"In 2010, through the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, Congress required the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to update the CACFP meal pattern and better align it with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Under the proposed rule, meals served to children in child care will include a greater variety of vegetables and fruits, more whole grains, and less sugar and fat. This proposal is the first major update of the CACFP meal patterns since the program's inception in 1968. The public has 90 days to comment, with all comments due by April 15, 2015."

On January 9, 2015, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a proposed rule with new science-based nutrition standards for meals provided through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). The CACFP provides reimbursements for meals and snacks served to children in child care facilities, after-school programs, and emergency shelters. Each day, an average of 475,000 children in California are benefitting from the nutrition resources provided through CACFP. 

California has more than 3 million children between the ages of 0 and 5, of which more than one in four (26.6%) live in poverty. Early childhood is a critical time of development. Nutrition habits and preferences are developed within the first five years of life. Young children are especially vulnerable to the impacts of food insecurity, with poor nutrition affecting a young child's ability to learn and grow. CACFP is an essential component of our child care system. Not only does the program ensure young children in child care receive adequate and healthful foods, but it also supports the overall quality of child care. 

Welcome to Friday Facts! Each week we'll be taking a look at a specific chart from the Data & Resources section of our website. This week we're focusing on the percentage of children, by race and ethnicity, living in poverty in Sacramento County.

One key determinant of health is family economics. In our 2012 report, The Landscape of Opportunity: Cultivating Health Equity in California, we discussed how living in poverty can impact a person’s health. For example, we found that, according to the California Health Interview Survey, the rates of self-reported poor or fair overall health are much higher for those who are living below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), which is currently $11,770 a year for an individual and $24,250 for a family of four.

For today’s Friday Facts, we’re taking a look at a particularly vulnerable population in a location best known as the seat of power for the state. As you can see from the table on our website, there are high rates of poverty among children in Sacramento County. In particular, children in communities of color experience high rates of poverty. For example, African American children (42.2%) are nearly three times as likely to live in poverty as their White counterparts (14.8%). Latino children (34.8%) and Asian children (22.2%) are also more likely to live in poverty than White children.