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Cultural Competency

Blog Posts tagged "Cultural Competency"

The Network of Ethnic Physician Organizations (NEPO) is happy to announce the 2015 Building Healthy Communities (BHC) Summit: Helping Health Providers Address Social Determinants of Health. This event, from September 18-20 in Riverside, is a unique and exciting educational event for physicians, public health professionals, and community leaders. The 2015 BHC Summit will provide you with opportunities to learn about emerging health policy issues, best practices for reducing health disparities, and cultural competency in clinical care.

The Summit will inspire physicians and healthcare providers to participate in community health efforts and to be challenged to improve health care and the quality of life in their communities. You will have the opportunity to hear from nationally acclaimed thought leaders and network with colleagues. Our keynote speakers include California Secretary of State Alex Padilla and George Halvorson, the chair of the First 5 Commission of California. We are also pleased to offer CME credits. 

The BHC Summit will also be hosting a poster presentation session for current medical students. We would like to extend to any medical student an opportunity to participate in a poster presentation displaying their health care research. This is a wonderful opportunity for students to display their work and network with other health care providers. For additional information, including guidelines and application, click here.

After an eventful few weeks, Friday Facts is back! May is both Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and National High Blood Pressure Education Month, so today’s edition of Friday Facts will focus on the disparate rates of high blood pressure in California’s Asian subgroups.

As you can see from the chart, there are some dramatic variations in high blood pressure rates across the Asian ethnic subgroups. Japanese adults, for example, have the highest rate at 35.4%, which is higher than other populations, including Chinese (18.2%) and South Asian (8.2%) adults.

In attempts to understand and address these disparities between ethnic subgroups, researchers have found that physicians should consider the role culture plays when treating patients for high blood pressure and other chronic conditions.

“Our results suggest that susceptible populations like the Filipino and Japanese subgroups may warrant early and aggressive intervention in blood pressure reduction to help decrease cardiovascular risk,” said Dr. Powell Jose, Research Physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute. “Physicians should attempt to better understand cultural differences and barriers that may influence diet and health behaviors in Asian-American subgroups. Nutrition and lifestyle counseling must be offered to these higher risk populations to help control hypertension in addition to medical therapy, when indicated.”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has proposed a regulation to require electronic health record systems to document and use disaggregated data on race, ethnicity, language, sexual orientation, gender identity, and social and behavioral factors that influence health. This data will make it easier to identify disparities and achieve health equity. 

The regulation would require up to 900 race and ethnicity categories and up to 600 language categories, the first time that any federal department has required comprehensive disaggregation. This also would be the first time that sexual orientation and gender identity data would be routinely collected.
 
Public comments supporting this proposed regulation are needed. Please submit yours today! 
While comments submitted by organizations are important, it also is very important for individual members of the public to submit personalized comments.
 
Please submit your comments online no later than 2 pm PT on May 29, 2015. Click on the blue "Comment Now!" button on the top right of the page. You can either type in your comments or upload a file from your computer.
 
You can use these key messages to guide your comments.