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Data and Research

Blog Posts tagged "Data and Research"

To effectively identify racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care, it is essential that key elements such as patient race, ethnicity, and language proficiency be collected routinely and then utilized to measure performance. There is now also great attention being given to the impact of social determinants on health disparities--including environmental factors, food insecurity, transportation, and safe housing--among others. Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence of the American Hospital Association and the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital are hosting a webinar, “Going Beyond REaL Data Collection: Collecting Social Determinants of Health” on Tuesday, February 23rd, from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT.

This webinar will discuss strategies and approaches implemented by hospitals and health care systems to collect the social determinants of health, with the understanding that this information will be critical for population health efforts of health plans, hospitals and health centers nationwide. Speakers include:

  • Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS, Director, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital
  • Lenny López, MD, MDiv, MPH, Chief of Hospital Medicine, University of California San Francisco - SFVA and Senior Faculty, the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Aswita Tan-McGrory, MBA, MSPH, Deputy Director, Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital

If interested in attending, please register online

For more information contact Andrea Madu at amadu@partners.org.

 

This post originally appeared on the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education's blog, Raising the Bar.

According to newly released data from the Census, the first year of the Affordable Care Act succeeded in reducing the ranks of the uninsured while having little effect on employer sponsored coverage. California was no exception, and indeed showed the fifth largest drop in uninsurance of any state.

The share of Californians under 65 years of age who were uninsured for the entire year fell by about 5 percentage points from 16.4% in 2013 to 11.4% in 2014, according to the newly released Current Population Survey (CPS) data. This amounts to 3.8 million Californians age 0-64 who remained uninsured throughout 2014, 1.6 million fewer than in 2013.

The major changes in coverage occurred because of the opening of the Covered California health care marketplace, through which 88% of enrollees received federal subsidies, and the expansion of MediCal, California’s Medicaid program. The share of Californians with insurance through an employer for any part of the year remained steady, at about 55% of the non-elderly population.

Fig 1. Percentage point change in coverage rate by coverage type, Californians age 0-64, CPS 2013 to 2014

fig1

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of September 14, 2015. This week was highlighted by the U.S. Census Bureau’s release of national and state-level poverty and insurance coverage data. As such, this edition of TWEET features many analyses of this data:

More Americans have health insurance now than any year on record. Check out this great analysis of the Census data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.


Here’s another way of looking at how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has reduced uninsurance rates across the country.

Many American cities are experiencing an economic revival, but this rising economic tide is not translating into good jobs, living wages, and ownership opportunities for their low-income communities and communities of color. City leaders face an urgent need to put in place policies and strategies to counter deepening inequality and build “all-in cities” where all residents — especially those who’ve long been excluded — can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential.

Understanding the state of equity in cities is critical to advancing this agenda, which is why PolicyLink and the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) are expanding the National Equity Atlas to include detailed data disaggregated by race, nativity, and income for the 100 largest cities. The National Equity Atlas is a first-of-its-kind data and policy tool that provides indicators of demographic change, racial and economic inclusion, and the economic benefits of equity for all 50 states, the 150 largest regions, and nationwide.

Please join us on September 30th for a tour of the new city data and learn how you can use it to advance policies and strategies to build more equitable, resilient, and vibrant cities.

I will be moderating a panel of speakers that includes:

For many health advocates across California, today has been highlighted on the calendar for months. That’s because it’s the day that the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research released the results of the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) for 2013 and 2014. As the most detailed source of health data for California’s diverse population, CHIS is instrumental to our advocacy efforts here at CPEHN as we work to eliminate the inequities faced by communities of color.

During a seminar earlier today, Dr. Ninez Ponce (a former CPEHN board member) and Dr. David Grant discussed the survey and some of the results. One exciting new feature of CHIS is that you can now access individual year data from 2011 to 2014. Before, the data was released every two years, but now the plan is to release new data each year:

"This is a significant development that will provide policymakers and others with much more timely data on the health of Californians," said David Grant, director of CHIS.

The 2013 and 2014 CHIS data is particularly interesting because it shows the impact of the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansions. We are in the midst of the largest reduction in uninsurance rates in a generation and prior to today we were still looking for solid information on the scope of the ACA’s impact. In a new fact sheet also released today, the UCLA Center showed how the uninsured rate in California dropped significantly in 2014, thanks in large part to a large increase in Medi-Cal recipients.

Welcome to Friday Facts! Each week we'll be taking a look at a specific chart from the Data & Resources section of our website. This week we're focusing on the percentage of children, by race and ethnicity, living in poverty in Sacramento County.

One key determinant of health is family economics. In our 2012 report, The Landscape of Opportunity: Cultivating Health Equity in California, we discussed how living in poverty can impact a person’s health. For example, we found that, according to the California Health Interview Survey, the rates of self-reported poor or fair overall health are much higher for those who are living below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), which is currently $11,770 a year for an individual and $24,250 for a family of four.

For today’s Friday Facts, we’re taking a look at a particularly vulnerable population in a location best known as the seat of power for the state. As you can see from the table on our website, there are high rates of poverty among children in Sacramento County. In particular, children in communities of color experience high rates of poverty. For example, African American children (42.2%) are nearly three times as likely to live in poverty as their White counterparts (14.8%). Latino children (34.8%) and Asian children (22.2%) are also more likely to live in poverty than White children.

Welcome to Tuesday Tidbits! If you would like your resource/event to be highlighted, please let me know at ddexter@cpehn.org. Thanks!

If you’ve been following our blog over the last couple weeks, you know that we have been doing a lot of work on improving California’s mental health system. We have been to Fresno, Oakland, Los Angeles, and San Diego for town hall meetings to receive public comment on the California Reducing Disparities Project’s draft Statewide Strategic Plan to Reduce Mental Health Disparities.

At these events, we have received a lot of great feedback, and a lot of it has focused on the best ways to provide behavioral health services to California’ diverse communities. We have heard a lot about integrating medical care and behavioral health services in a single, community-based environment. Many have supported this strategy, and now, thanks to the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, we have some data to demonstrate the effectiveness of behavioral health integration. The recently released brief, One-Stop Shopping: Efforts to Integrate Physical and Behavioral Health Care in Five California Community Health Centers, takes a look at five large community health centers — which treat anywhere from 12,000 to 70,000 patients per year — and how they have integrated medical and behavioral health services.

Healthy City's Community Research Lab (CRL) shares best practices and methods for community-based organizations interested in supporting their strategies with research that combines community knowledge and HealthyCity.org technology. 

Working with residents in Santa Ana, the Alliance for California Traditional Arts recorded, highlighted, and mapped "Cultural Treasures" including individuals, organizations, places, and events. Through these maps they were able to share community knowledge, locate resources, and provide photos, videos, and other details in English and Spanish about these assets.

If you are interested in working with others in your community to research an issue, visualize your community’s story, and share your maps and research, join us in Orange County on February 24th – 26th as we host three days of free workshops!

The workshops run from 10 am – 4pm, and the topics will include:

Day 1: Community Assets on a Map: Facilitating a Community-Engaged Mapping Session
Day 2: Visualizing Your Community: Creating Maps that Tell Your Community's Story
Day 3: Hyperlocal Communications: Sharing Your Maps and Research

Apply to join us for one or all days! Space is limited and priority is given to organizations in Orange County working on behalf of community-based organizations on specific projects.

If you are interested in attending, you can apply online today. Applications are due by February 20th.