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Disparities

Blog Posts tagged "Disparities"

California’s Office of the Patient Advocate just released new 2016-17 health plan report cards to help guide and inform consumers as they shop for coverage during the open enrollment season which is set to begin: November 1, 2016.

The report cards rate California’s 10 largest HMOs, five largest PPOs and over 200 commercial medical groups on quality and patient experience. In addition, county-level ratings of medical groups with newly added cost ratings are also included. This on-line tool makes it easier for employers and consumers to make side-by side comparisons for choosing the right plan.  

What do the Report Cards Measure?

OPA uses data from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), a non-profit that that works to improve health care quality through the administration of evidence-based standards, measures, programs, and accreditation. To arrive at these ratings NCQA analyzes scores on clinical performance and patient satisfaction data.

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One of the ways CPEHN participated in National Minority Health Month in April was by co-hosting a panel of experts with the Asian Pacific Islander Capital Association to discuss the status of health equity among the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community. The experts highlighted various approaches we can all take to eliminate health disparities disproportionally affecting certain API communities.

What are the barriers keeping communities from achieving a healthy community?

“You can’t fix what you don’t know,” proclaimed Jonathan Tran from The California Endowment. He was referring to the lack of information and data available regarding South East Asian communities. Before funding and resources can be streamlined into building a healthier community, access to comprehensive data must exist. Since data regarding Asian Americans is characterized for as a whole, research studies are limited in their ability to accurately identify information about the issues affecting specific Asian American subgroups. When all communities are counted for and validated, the numbers can be used to implement change. The AHEAD Act — AB 1726 — addresses this necessary concern by requiring higher education institutions and public health agencies to disaggregate data for additional API groups.

Covered California Sees Strong Enrollment Numbers in 2016: Covered California released a detailed breakout of its 2016 enrollees at its Board meeting on February 18. Nearly 440,000 new enrollees had selected a Qualified Health Plan (QHP) as of February 6, 2016. Low-income (88%) and communities of color (66%) continue to represent the majority of Exchange enrollees with Asians at 20%, Pacific Islanders at >1%, Black or African-American at 4%, Latino at 36%, American Indian or Alaskan Native at > 1%, and multiple races/other at 7%.

While Covered California’s preliminary enrollment numbers are strong, they provide an incomplete picture of the enrollee population as close to one-third of enrollees (119,510) did not respond to demographic questions. Covered California plans to provide additional data on its 2016 enrollee population including information on the written and spoken languages of its enrollees at a later point this year.

California’s Office of the Patient Advocate (OPA) released its 2015-16 Health Care Quality Report Cards last week. The new report cards shed light on the quality of care under a variety of health care providers and plans, including California’s 10 largest HMOs, the six biggest PPOs, and more than 200 large medical groups covering 16 million consumers in California. The data is drawn from claims data and patient surveys.

The report cards are timely as consumers gear up for 2016 open enrollment, which begins Nov. 1, 2015, and continues through Jan. 31, 2016. With the release of the report cards, consumers should have an easier time shopping for coverage. Each HMO and PPO is evaluated on their overall medical care and for how it treats certain conditions like asthma and cancer as well as its behavior and mental health care. Further, the report card provides a deeper evaluation on how a health plan treats certain conditions through specific clinical indicators of good care. This helps consumers understand what they should expect from their coverage.

Welcome to Friday Facts! Each week we'll be taking a look at a specific chart from the Data & Resources section of our website. This week we're focusing on living wage in Alameda County.

If you haven’t heard, we are currently living in an era of nearly unprecedented income inequality in the United States. While the whole country is experiencing this phenomenon, it is especially noticeable in the Bay Area, where a recent study found that both San Francisco (2nd) and Oakland (7th) rank in the top 10 cities with the most income inequality.

For today’s edition of Friday Facts, we’re going to focus on the East Bay and in particular Alameda County, of which the City of Oakland represents a sizable portion. On our site, we have a chart examining, by race and ethnicity, the percentage of families of four in Alameda County that make a living wage. In this data set, the California Department of Public Health determines a living wage to be at least $22.64 an hour and is defined as “the hourly wage rate or annual income that a sole provider working full time (2080 hours/yr) must earn to provide his/her family a minimum standard of living, covering costs of food, child care, health insurance, housing, transportation, and other necessities.”

Even a cursory glance at the numbers would show striking disparities along racial and ethnic lines, with all communities of color seeing higher rates of families earning below a living wage than Whites. Latino families, for example, are five times as likely to earn less than a living wage than are Whites. 

Disparities Solutions Center

The Disparities Solutions Center is now accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Disparities Leadership Program (DLP) until February 13, 2015. We welcome applicants from across the country, especially from California.

The DLP is our year-long, hands-on executive education program focused exclusively on helping health care leaders achieve equity in quality. The program is designed to help you translate the latest understanding of the problem of disparities into realistic solutions you can adopt within your organization.

Through the DLP, we aim to create leaders prepared to meet the challenges of health care transformation by improving quality for at-risk populations who experience disparities. The program has three main goals: