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Blog Posts tagged "Education"

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of September 28, 2015. Our weekly potpourri of social justice topics includes a number of interesting resources this week. Check it out:

Illinois Congressman Luis V. Gutierrez introduced the Exchange Inclusion for a Healthy America Act 2015, which would allow undocumented immigrants to purchase coverage through federal exchanges.

 

Curbing air pollution could save thousands of lives over the next 10 years.

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of August 31, 2015. Since it’s Labor Day weekend, let’s start with some labor-related posts:

The UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education has several great resources about the state of the job market here in California and across the country.

The Center is also hosting a training session on strategic campaigns for community organizations.

Another great webinar from the American Public Health Association this week detailed how those who benefit from privilege often have a hard time recognizing it.

Cristian Remollo’s path towards the school-to-prison pipeline began in elementary school with a suspension for a fight. Forty-nine suspensions and one expulsion later, at 14 years old, Cristian was sentenced to San Mateo County Juvenile Hall for second degree robbery. He would be released two months later, on probation and with an ankle bracelet. However, Cristian’s contact with the juvenile justice system didn’t end there. From ages 14 to 16, Cristian would serve in juvenile hall on a total of three separate occasions.

The reality is that Cristian’s experience of returning to juvenile hall is actually common in the United States. Cristian is one of 61,000 youth in the country who eat, sleep, and go to school in juvenile detention facilities. There are stark inequities in a young person’s quality of life once he or she enters the juvenile justice system. Once a young person comes into contact with the juvenile justice system, young people, age 16 and under, are 26% less likely to finish high school by the age of 19. Roughly 70% of the juvenile reentry population will return to juvenile hall by 19. These inequities particularly impact communities of color. Despite representing less than 30% of the nation’s population, Black and Latino youth compose nearly 60% of the juvenile population currently detained.

California is a land of contrasts – especially for its youth. African American males in our state – the world’s 8th largest economy – are 18 times more likely to die from homicide than are their white peers. African American and Latina teen girls are three times more likely to have a baby than their White or Asian counterparts. African Americans are 40 percent more likely to have asthma than Whites and their death rate from asthma is two times higher.

Despite their health needs being greater, these communities have limited access to services. We know that African American and Latino youth in low-income communities are exposed to high levels of violence and stress, but only one in 10 who needs mental health services ever receives them.

Welcome to Friday Facts! Each week we'll be taking a look at a specific chart from the Data & Resources section of our website. This week we're focusing on students reporting depression-related feelings in Fresno County.

We have been talking a lot about mental health recently. If you’ve been following the blog this week, you will have seen that we hosted two town hall meetings, one in Fresno and the other in Oakland, to discuss the California Reducing Disparities Project’s (CRDP) draft Statewide Strategic Plan to Reduce Mental Health Disparities. These events have generated great discussion and a number of comments that we will be incorporating into the final plan after the ongoing public comment period ends on February 17th.

While we have talked so much about the strategic plan in this space, we haven’t focused on some of the actual mental health needs that it will address. So, for this Friday Facts, we are going to look at a chart representing the percentage of students experiencing depression-related feelings in Fresno County. As you can see, at least 1 in 4 students in each racial/ethnic group have reported experiencing depression-related feelings in the last year. There are some noticeable disparities, as Pacific Islanders (nearly half), Asians, and Latinos reported experiencing depression-related feelings at higher rates. But it is clear that this particular issue impacts all communities.