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Food Security

Blog Posts tagged "Food Security"

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of October 5, 2015. There was so much bill-signing excitement last week that we’re a couple days late for this anxiously anticipated edition of TWEET. Don’t worry, we still have a lot of great stuff in here, including:

Great feature in the New York Times about how soda consumption is decreasing.

While most people drive to work, alternative forms of transportation (walking, biking, etc.) are becoming more popular.

There are more sobering statistics about mass incarceration in America, particularly among African American young men.

Welcome to Friday Facts! Each week we'll be taking a look at a specific chart from the Data & Resources section of our website. This week we're focusing on food security in Alameda County.

We’ve talked before about how the economic prosperity of the Bay Area has not trickled down to all populations in the region, but in today’s Friday Facts we’ll see some striking disparities in the East Bay.

Food security, simply put, is the ability to afford enough food on a consistent basis. In today’s Friday Facts chart, we can see the rates of food insecurity, by race and ethnicity, among people in Alameda County living below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level. Among this population, African Americans (57.4%) are more than twice as likely as Whites (26.9%) to be unable to afford food on a consistent basis, and Latinos (50.2%) are nearly twice as likely. These families often have to make the difficult choice between food and other basic needs.

In our brief, The Inextricable Connection between Food Insecurity and Diabetes, we examined the health impacts of food insecurity. We found that adults living with the most severe levels of food insecurity have more than twice the risk of developing diabetes as adults who are not food insecure.

While it might seem a paradox that food insecurity would lead to the consumption of more unhealthy foods, we found that that is often the case for a number of reasons, including: