Join Our Network

Follow Us:

  • RSS

Medicare

Blog Posts tagged "Medicare"

This month, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a comprehensive report to promote equity in the Medicare program, which is relied upon by millions of older adults across the country. The report, The CMS Equity Plan for Improving Quality in Medicare, offers a four-year strategy to reduce disparities in communities of color, rural communities, and the LGBTQ population.

In today’s California Healthline, CPEHN’s Executive Director, Sarah de Guia, applauded CMS’s effort and noted the imperative of improving Medicare for communities of color and the LGBTQ population:

"We are heartened to see CMS focus on the persistent disparities impacting communities of color, the LGBT community, rural communities and persons with disabilities," said Sarah de Guia, CPEHN executive director. 

"This information will provide us a path forward to understanding the impacts of health disparities and identify ways to reverse the inequities that result from them," de Guia said.

Today we celebrate the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the Social Security Amendments of 1965, an act that created both the Medicare and Medicaid programs. With one stroke of his pen, President Johnson put in place an unprecedented commitment to health that has impacted the lives of hundreds of millions of Americans. 

The Medicaid program – Medi-Cal here in California – began as a federal-state partnership to cover medical expenses for families receiving public assistance. After it was separated from welfare in the 1990s, Medicaid has continued to grow and now covers more than 80 million people, including roughly one-third of American children. In California, following the successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act’s expansions, Medi-Cal now covers over 12 million low-income individuals, including nearly half of all children in the state. The program serves to address key inequities in the health care system, in particular the coverage gaps faced by communities of color. While we’re still waiting on a reliable breakdown of Medi-Cal enrollees by race and ethnicity after the expansion, communities of color likely represent a large majority of recipients. (In 2013, communities of color made up over 80% of the Medi-Cal population and nearly half spoke a language other than English.)