Join Our Network

Follow Us:

  • RSS

Sugar Sweetened Beverages

Blog Posts tagged "Sugar Sweetened Beverages"

This post originally appeared on SPUR's blog.

Last November, the City of Berkeley made the news — and history — by becoming the first U.S city to pass a sugar-sweetened beverage tax, often called a soda tax. Measure D was a significant victory for supporters, because it passed with 76% of the vote despite the $2.5 million campaign against the proposal by the American Beverage Association.

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of October 19, 2015. Another eventful week comes to a close, and we have some great social media resources for you. Check it out:

Another report that shows that soda taxes can be effective at reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Most Americans understand the importance of access to healthy foods.

Here are some tax policy solutions to help alleviate poverty across the country.

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of October 5, 2015. There was so much bill-signing excitement last week that we’re a couple days late for this anxiously anticipated edition of TWEET. Don’t worry, we still have a lot of great stuff in here, including:

Great feature in the New York Times about how soda consumption is decreasing.

While most people drive to work, alternative forms of transportation (walking, biking, etc.) are becoming more popular.

There are more sobering statistics about mass incarceration in America, particularly among African American young men.

Welcome to This Week in Equity Engagement on Twitter (TWEET) for the week of September 28, 2015. Our weekly potpourri of social justice topics includes a number of interesting resources this week. Check it out:

Illinois Congressman Luis V. Gutierrez introduced the Exchange Inclusion for a Healthy America Act 2015, which would allow undocumented immigrants to purchase coverage through federal exchanges.

 

Curbing air pollution could save thousands of lives over the next 10 years.

A couple weeks back, we wrote about how San Francisco took a key step toward reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages by passing an ordinance requiring warning labels on advertisements for the products. We also talked about ongoing efforts at the statewide level aimed at confronting the health crisis posed by sugary drinks. In particular, we pointed to two bills: SB 203 (Monning), which would have required warning labels similar to those passed in San Francisco, and AB 1357 (Bloom), which would have imposed a two cent per ounce fee on the distribution on the beverages. Unfortunately, both of these bills failed to pass through the legislature. But a new study out of Mexico might breathe new life into at least one of these efforts in the coming years.

A new study by Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health and the University of North Carolina has found that Mexico’s national sugar-sweetened beverage tax implemented in 2014 has led to a reduction in consumption of the drinks. The tax of one peso per liter (roughly a 10% increase) was found to reduce consumption across the country, and particularly in low-income communities.

In recent years, public health advocates have ramped up efforts to highlight the health consequences of consuming soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages. Today, those efforts yielded some success as San Francisco supervisors approved an ordinance that requires advertisements for sugary drinks to include warning labels about the products’ adverse health side effects.

The ordinance applies to all drinks, including soda and energy drinks, that include 25 or more calories from sweeteners per 12 ounces. Advertising methods impacted include billboards, buses, and taxis within the city limits, but not newspapers and the internet. Milk and 100% natural fruit juice are exempted from the ordinance.

The supervisors behind the decision noted that inaction could not be justified in the face of a rising public health crisis:

The label for billboards and other ads would read: "WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. This is a message from the City and County of San Francisco…”

"These are not harmless products that taste good," said Supervisor Scott Wiener, who authored the soda warning proposal. "These are products that are making people sick and we need to take action."

The movement to alert consumers of the health dangers of sugar-sweetened beverages has been gaining steam in the Bay Area for some time. Last fall, voters in Berkeley approved a tax on the beverages in hopes of reducing consumption.

The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is creating a health crisis in California. Tomorrow, the Assembly Health Committee will be voting on an important bill that will begin to address this crisis.

AB 1357 (Bloom) – The Children and Family Health Promotion Program – will create a dedicated revenue source to fund community clinics, school based health centers, and preventive programs to address the health impacts of sugar sweetened beverages. An estimated $3 billion dollars will be raised annually through a small 2 cent per ounce fee on sugar-sweetened beverages. These funds would help improve the health of our communities by preventing diabetes and other devastating health impacts in California’s most vulnerable communities.
 
If you live in the following areas, please call your Assemblymember TODAY and ask them to support AB 1357!

Autumn Burke – Inglewood – (916) 319-2062
Jimmy Gomez – Los Angeles (Northeast) – (916) 319-2051
Lorena Gonzalez – San Diego (Chula Vista) – (916) 319-2080
Roger Hernandez – West Covina – (916) 319-2048
Sebastian Ridley-Thomas – Culver City – (916) 319-2054
Freddie Rodriguez – Chino/Pomona – (916) 319-2052
​Miguel Santiago – Los Angeles (Downtown) – (916) 319-2051

This article appeared on the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California's blog.

On May 12th, the California Assembly Health Committee will hear a new bill seeking to address one of the major health crises of our time. AB 1357 (Bloom) – The Children and Family Health Promotion Program – will create a dedicated revenue source enabling California to start to address the diabetes epidemic that is impacting our communities with devastating consequences. Comprehensive prevention efforts to reduce the diabetes epidemic in California will be supported through a 2 cent per ounce fee on sugary drinks that are distributed in the state.

California must get out in front of this preventable disease that is disproportionately affecting communities of color.

To “get” diabetes in our communities has become normal. As I travel across California where we host regional meetings from as far north as Eureka to El Centro in the South and all points in between, it saddens me when I ask those in the audience to raise their hands if someone in their immediate family has diabetes. It saddens me even more when I ask them if they have diabetes and they answer me, “Not yet” or “Todavia no.”

We cannot afford to wait any longer to take action.

Over 120 advocates gathered in Sacramento today to discuss legislation that could be key to improving health in California at ENACT Nutrition and Physical Activity Day. Attendees had the opportunity to hear about key legislation and learn some tips about meeting with legislators before conducting legislative visits later in the day. Here are some highlights from the day, with many posts from Twitter (#ENACT2015).

Assemblymember Phil Ting from San Francisco kicked things off with an introductory speech, acknowledging that legislators appreciate when their constituents visit with them about issues that impact the community.

Following the Assemblymember’s remarks, panels discussed each of the ENACT Day priority bills, including:

Update 7:55 pm

Unfortunately, SB 203 (Monning) did not receive enough votes to make it out of Senate Health Committee. Our allies, and the bill's sponsor, the California Center for Public Health Advocacy, puts it best:

Update 6:23 pm

Senator Richard Pan expressed support for the bill saying "I do believe the science and the rationale is there." Senator Lois Wolk also expressed support for the bill.

Senator Monning offered a powerful closing argument before the committee voted.