Join Our Network

Follow Us:

  • RSS

Voices for Health Equity

Voices for Health Equity

Ensuring Healthy Development Without Displacement Cover

A new Prevention Institute (PI) brief shares key learnings from a recent summit in Los Angeles (LA) to discuss tools and strategies for supporting healthy community development without displacing current residents. The October meeting of policymakers, funders, academics, practitioners, and resident activists added a strong health frame to the ongoing conversation in LA on gentrification and displacement.

To effectively identify racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care, it is essential that key elements such as patient race, ethnicity, and language proficiency be collected routinely and then utilized to measure performance. There is now also great attention being given to the impact of social determinants on health disparities--including environmental factors, food insecurity, transportation, and safe housing--among others. Hospitals in Pursuit of Excellence of the American Hospital Association and the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital are hosting a webinar, “Going Beyond REaL Data Collection: Collecting Social Determinants of Health” on Tuesday, February 23rd, from 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM PT.

This webinar will discuss strategies and approaches implemented by hospitals and health care systems to collect the social determinants of health, with the understanding that this information will be critical for population health efforts of health plans, hospitals and health centers nationwide. Speakers include:

  • Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS, Director, UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital
  • Lenny López, MD, MDiv, MPH, Chief of Hospital Medicine, University of California San Francisco - SFVA and Senior Faculty, the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Aswita Tan-McGrory, MBA, MSPH, Deputy Director, Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital

If interested in attending, please register online

For more information contact Andrea Madu at amadu@partners.org.

 

Focus Group

Since 1992, CPEHN has been working to improve the health of communities of color in California, and in 2015 we embarked on an exciting new project around oral health equity. Since last year, we have been preparing to conduct a multicultural community needs assessment throughout the state.

We partnered with nine community organizations representing diverse constituencies and health needs. These core partners are Asian Health Services and Roots Community Clinic in Oakland, Sacramento Native American Health Center, Centro Binacional para el Dessarrollo Indigena Oaxaqueno in Fresno, Korean Resource Center and Black Women for Wellness in Los Angeles, Latino Health Access in Orange County, Nile Sisters in San Diego, and the Inland Empire Immigrant Youth Coalition.

Our core partners have started hosting community discussions to identify oral health needs, barriers, possible solutions, and perspectives. In the past couple weeks, I had the opportunity to attend community discussion sessions in Los Angeles coordinated by Black Women for Wellness and in San Diego coordinated by Nile Sisters.

Public health agencies, community partners, and activists at the local and state level play a critical role in advancing public health. Cities and states are testing grounds for innovative and progressive policies that protect health and safety —like New York City’s law on smoke-free spaces, Berkeley’s soda tax, and Seattle’s paid sick days ordinance. When these policies work, they reshape our shared understanding of how to address problems like economic injustice, chronic disease, and environmental hazards, and generate momentum for broader changes. 

While preemption is appropriate under some circumstances—for example, federal laws that set a floor for clean air standards ‘preempt’ less protective state and local laws—it’s often a tool used to stop progress in its tracks. Preemption refers to legislation typically introduced by industry groups to shield profits and practices from regulation—and strip law-making authority from local (or state) governments. In recent years, industry groups have successfully lobbied for laws to limit communities’ ability to designate smoke-free spaces, regulate fracking, require paid sick days, and protect kids from junk food marketing. 

Prevention Institute and Grassroots Change will equip you with tools to push back against preemption, via our January 28, 2016 webinar “Preemption in 2016 and Beyond: Emerging Issues and Best Practices.” We will provide practical case studies illustrating the evolving threat and best practices to stop preemption, as well as the role of health and safety practitioners in protecting local control. Register today and join us on Twitter at #Preemption2016: 

Taking a Bite out of Oral Health Inequities Cover

Oral health is about more than just toothaches and cavities -- it can have a huge impact in your overall health. This is why CPEHN, with the support of the DentaQuest Foundation, has engaged more deeply over the past nine months to advance oral health equity for California’s communities of color. Just this month, we published a new policy brief, Taking a Bite out of Oral Health Inequities: Promoting Equitable Oral Health Policies for Communities of Color, to highlight oral health disparities within communities of color, identify some of the causes of these inequities, and share policy recommendations to advance equity for our communities.

Some of the key takeaways from the report include:

The Governor’s budget includes a $16.2 billion plan for the state’s transportation needs, with $3.2 billion in proposed new revenue. Unfortunately, the Governor’s transportation plan is business as usual, at the expense of public health and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The $3.2 billion in proposed new funding replicates the Governor’s plan introduced in August last year during the transportation special session. The majority of those funds will go towards repaving roads and expanding trade corridors, doing little to expand active transportation and advance transportation mode shift. Details of the proposal include:

CPEHN applauds the Governor’s renewed commitment to expand health care to California’s undocumented children but urges greater investment in the health of communities of color broadly given the projected $3.6 billion surplus.

On Thursday, January 7th, Governor Jerry Brown released his proposed FY 2016-17 state budget, which includes modest increases in Medi-Cal and other safety-net programs. We are elated to see that the Governor’s proposal maintains the state’s prior commitment to expand full-scope Medi-Cal to undocumented children starting on May 1, 2016. Additionally, we applaud the Governor’s tax revenue proposal to extend the Managed Care Tax (MCO), which is set to expire in 2016. The tax proposal, pending negotiations between the Governor and health plans, will provide $1.1 billion in state funding to help defray the cost of the In-Home Supportive Services program (IHSS) and other health care services. The 2016-17 budget also includes a small increase in SSI/SSP grants for seniors and persons with disabilities, the first increase since 2006.

With a large projected revenue surplus, however, the budget proposal misses important opportunities to invest in the health of California’s new majority, communities of color. The budget, for example, does not seek to restore dental benefits or concretely address the lack of comprehensive health care coverage for undocumented adults. Further, the $3.2 billion in additional revenues for transportation will primarily fund repaving roads and expanding trade corridors rather than expanding funding for active transportation to positively impact climate change and public health. We also urge the elimination of the Maximum Family Grant (MFG) in the CalWORKs program, which unfairly denies financial support to babies born while their families are receiving grants.

Prevention Institute (PI) and The College for Behavioral Health Leadership are co-hosting Summit 2016 - Population Health: Leadership for Building Healthier Communities this April 6-8, 2016 in San Diego. Conference participants will seek to identify and address opportunities for improvement, promote emerging consensus, contribute to the evolution of behavioral health and wellness, and positively impact the health of communities.

The Summit will feature:

On Friday, CPEHN and 17 diverse public health, environmental, and climate change related organizations signed onto a joint letter to the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research commending the recently revised 2015 General Plan Guidelines, which includes new chapters on Healthy Communities and Social Equity, Environmental Justice, and Community Resiliency as well as an updated Public Engagement and Outreach chapter. The revised Guidelines show promise in directing cities and counties to consider health and social equity in future development.

In addition to the strong support for these chapters, the joint letter outlined several recommendations for strengthening them. For example, we call upon OPR to more prominently acknowledge the changing racial, ethnic, economic, and aging demographics of California. By understanding these demographic shifts, our cities and counties can better consider existing and future needs, especially in historically under-resourced communities.  We also recommend the document define key terms, such as health and equity, to build awareness and understanding at the outset of the planning process and to utilize visual representations of key concepts or frameworks within the Guidelines.

The specific chapters on which our groups focused our analysis included Public Engagement and Outreach (Chapter 3), Healthy Communities (Chapter 5), and Social Equity, Environmental Justice, & Community Resilience (Chapter 6). The comment letter also reflected feedback from community workshops hosted by CPEHN in partnership with OPR in Oakland, Fresno, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Orange County in November 2015.

On September 30, 2015, the California Mental Health Services Act Multicultural Coalition (CMMC) presented highlights from various State of the State Reports at the Behavioral Health Policy Forum in Carlsbad. One report focused on the experiences of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) community and their access to mental health services in California. DHH community college students were asked to share their personal experiences and these short videos are highlights from their stories. The DHH State of the State Report and others can be found on the Racial and Ethnic Mental Health Disparities Coalition (REMHDCO) website.

Pages