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State Budget

State Budget

Track the budget process with news about the latest proposals and their impact on California’s communities of color.

Updated 2/19/2020

Governor Newsom's Budget Takes Bold Steps to Improve Health Outcomes for All Californians

On Friday, January 10th, Governor Gavin Newsom released his FY 2020-2021 State Budget. The $222 billion spending plan proposes an historic investment in health care for all, expanding Medi-Cal to undocumented older adults over age 65 regardless of immigration status. With this step, California will be one step closer to achieving universal coverage. The budget also includes funds to help pay for the state’s “Medi-Cal Healthier California for All” waiver initiative (formerly Cal-AIM), which includes the provision of enhanced care management and in lieu of services for those with complex care needs, an expansion of whole person care approaches statewide and efforts to build upon existing dental initiatives. While CPEHN supports many of the stated goals of the waiver, we are concerned about the lack of investment in preventive care as well as the heavy reliance on managed care plans to provide mandated safety-net services without adequate requirements to advance health equity and equitable access to care and will be working with state and legislative partners on ways to strengthen these provisions.

The Governor also proposes to consolidate several offices into a new Center for Data Insights and Innovation. Housed under the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS), the Center would convene all of the offices and departments under it to develop a more integrated approach to addressing health disparities and improving health outcomes for all. CPEHN believes it is time for California to establish a Master Plan on Equity and looks forward to working with CHHS to achieve those aims. The new spending plan also establishes a new Health Care Affordability office, a single drug-purchasing market and state-owned generic drug label to improve price transparency and control the cost of health care and prescription drugs as well as an investment of $750 million in funds to tackle the state’s homelessness crisis by strengthening the availability of affordable housing.

While we are encouraged by these actions, we look forward to working together with the Administration and the Legislature to include several priorities that would help to advance health equity including funds to ensure counties are providing culturally and linguistically competent mental health care services, translated and easy to understand Medi-Cal notices, and access to a broader set of asthma related services, including environmental remediation services.

The Budget forecast projects a $5.6 billion surplus and assumes federal approval of the Managed Care Organization tax authorized in Chapter 348, Statutes of 2019 (AB 115) with revenue beginning to accrue in 2021-22. To view the full budget proposal click here.


Highlights of the FY 2020-2021 Budget:

Overview

  • Total Budget: $222 Billion
  • General Fund Spending: $153 Billion
  • Total Spending for Health & Human Services: $167.9 billion
  • Rainy Day Fund: Governor Newsom is proposing to add a portion of the state’s surplus to the Rainy-Day Fund, bringing the Fund to $18 billion by 2022-23.

Key Items

  • Medi-Cal Expansion for Older Adults over age 65 regardless of immigration status ($80.5 million): The Budget includes additional funds to expand Medi-Cal eligibility to older adults aged 65 and older no sooner than January 1, 2021. California currently pays for federally required emergency care. This expansion will provide preventative care to an estimated 27,000 undocumented seniors in the first year. Full implementation costs are projected to be approximately $350 million in 2022-23 and ongoing. Though this investment gets us closer to universal access for all of California’s undocumented community members, we continue to have a gap in coverage for those aged 26-64. We look to the Governor and the Legislature to close this gap in coming fiscal years so that we can achieve healthcare for all regardless of status.
     
  • “Medi-Cal Healthier California for All” (formerly known as Cal-AIM) ($695 million, growing to 1.4 billion in 2022-23): The budget also includes funds to help pay for the state’s waiver initiative, effective January 1, 2021 and ongoing. The proposal ends the Health Homes Program (HHP) despite loss of federal match and the Whole Person Care program, rolling those two programs into a new enhanced care management benefit for patients with complex care needs, administered by managed care plans. The initiative also allows health plans the option of providing services such as  housing navigation/supporting services, recuperative care, respite, sobering center, etc. as an In Lieu of Service (ILOS) which are services provided as a substitute, or to avoid, other services such as a hospital or skilled nursing facility admission or a discharge delay. CPEHN would like to see additional asthma related and mental health services considered as an In Lieu of Service. The Administration proposes $112.5 million to continue and expand some elements of the Dental Transformation Initiative, including an expansion to adults of provider incentives for preventive services and continuity of care; caries risk assessment and adding silver diamine fluoride as a covered service for children. The Administration also proposes to spend $45.1 million to implement a Behavioral Health Quality Improvement Program which would provide funding to county-operated community mental health and substance use disorder systems to incentivize system changes and process improvements including enhanced data-sharing capability for care coordination, value-based payment such as data collection, performance measurement, and reporting.

While CPEHN supports many of the stated goals of the waiver, we are concerned about the lack of investment in preventive care as well as DHCS’ heavy reliance on managed care plans to provide mandated safety-net services without adequate requirements on health plans to advance health equity and equitable access to care. We will be working with state and legislative partners on ways to strengthen these provisions.

  • Strengthening Health Plan Accountability/Achieving Mental Health Parity: The Governor’s spending plan alludes to a new promise to update and strengthen its enforcement of behavioral health parity laws and other health plan requirements including timely access to treatment, network adequacy, benefit design, and plan policies. California’s waiver proposal shifts even greater responsibility to health plans for providing safety-net services despite years of stagnant quality outcomes. Additionally, California’s plans still fall far short of offering equitable access to mental health services five years after implementation of the mental health parity laws. CPEHN will be closely monitoring the Administration’s plan to strengthen health plan accountability and mental health parity, expected to be released this spring.
     
  • Establishment of a new Center for Data Insights and Innovation: The Governor is proposing to consolidate several offices into a new Center for Data Insights and Innovation. Housed under the Health and Human Services Agency, the Center would be tasked with, amongst other things, improving data integrity in order to generate more equitable health outcomes for all Californians. CPEHN believes it is time for California to establish a Master Plan on Equity and looks forward to providing input into the goals of the Center in order to achieve those aims.
     
  • Additional funds and initiatives aimed at:
    • Tackling the State’s Homelessness Crisis ($750 million): The budget proposes an initial investment of $750 million to launch the California Access to Housing and Services Fund tasked with creating a structure for the development of affordable housing units, supplementing and augmenting rental subsidies, and stabilizing board and care homes.
    • Improving Affordability: The budget proposes to establish a new office of Health Care Affordability that would be tasked with increasing price and quality transparency, developing specific strategies and cost targets for the different sectors of the health care industry, and financial consequences for entities that fail to meet these targets.
    • Strengthening California’s public option: The Health and Human Services Agency will develop options to strengthen enrollment, affordability, and choice through Covered California, including opportunities to leverage the statewide network of existing public Medi-Cal managed care plans.

Medi-Cal/Health Care Overall

  • Health 4 All Elders ($80.5 million): The budget newly includes $80.5 million for DHCS to expand full scope Medi-Cal for income eligible seniors regardless of immigration status 65 years and above, covering an estimated 27,000 undocumented persons in the first year. This includes $5.9 million General Fund in 2020-21, growing to $119.5 million General Fund in 2021-22, to support increased IHSS costs, beginning January 1, 2021. This investment moves the state towards universal coverage, which will further the state's cost containment goals.
     
  • “Medi-Cal Healthier California for All” (formerly known as Cal-AIM) ($695 million, growing to 1.4 billion in 2022-23): The budget also includes funds to help pay for the state’s waiver initiative, effective January 1, 2021 and ongoing. See analysis in key highlights above.
     
  • Strengthening the Public Option: The Health and Human Services Agency will develop options to strengthen enrollment, affordability, and choice through Covered California, including opportunities to leverage the statewide network of existing public Medi-Cal managed care plans.
     
  • State Savings for Reducing Health Care Costs: Medi-Cal Best Price—Current law authorizes the Department of Health Care Services to negotiate state supplemental rebates based, in part, on the best prices that manufacturers provide to other purchasers within the United States. The Budget proposes to expand the Department’s authority to consider the best prices offered by manufacturers internationally when conducting negotiations for state supplemental rebates.
     
  • Leveraging purchasing Power to Reduce the Cost of Prescription Drugs: The Administration will propose to establish a single market for drug pricing within the state. This proposal would enable all purchasers—Medi-Cal, California Public Employees' Retirement System, Covered California, private insurers, self-insured employers, and others—to combine their purchasing power. Drug manufacturers would have to bid to sell their drugs—at a uniform price—in the California market.

Medi-Cal Mental Health and Oral Health

  • Behavioral Health Quality Improvement Program ($45.1 million): In alignment with the Medi-Cal Healthier California for All initiative, the budget includes $45.1 million for the department to implement a Behavioral Health Quality Improvement Program. This program will provide funding to county-operated community mental health and substance use disorder systems to incentivize system changes and process improvements that will help counties prepare for opportunities through the Medi-Cal Healthier California for All initiative. Improvements include enhanced data-sharing capability for care coordination and establishing the foundational elements of value-based payment such as data collection, performance measurement, and reporting. The proposal fails to mention the infrastructure needed for community-based organizations that provide community-defined evidence practices or population specific strategies to further integrate into the Medi-Cal mental health delivery system. 
     
  • Updates to the Mental Health Services Act: Proposition 63, also known as the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), was approved by the voters in 2004 and imposes a 1-percent tax on personal income in excess of $1 million. Revenue generated under the Act primarily supports county mental health services. The administration plans to update the MHSA to focus on people with mental illness who are also experiencing homelessness, who are involved in the criminal justice system, and for early intervention for youth. However, racial and ethnic disparities also persist, with previous reports showing that white Medi-Cal consumers at a greater rate than any other racial or ethnic group. Currently, there is over $500 million of MHSA dollars in local reserves, $161 million of which must be spent by June 2020 or will otherwise be reverted back to the state.
     
  • Behavioral Health Parity: Currently, behavioral health parity laws require that health care service plans that provide mental health and substance use disorder (MH/SUD) benefits to provide those benefits at the same level as the plan's medical/surgical benefits. However, data shows poor outcomes in behavioral health treatment by health plans, with all health plans demonstrating utilization rates far below those that would correspond with the estimated need in the Medi-Cal population, with even worse outcomes in communities of color. The Governor’s proposal directs the California Health and Human Services Agency and the Department of Managed Health Care to work with health plans, providers, patient representatives, and other parties to update and strengthen its enforcement of behavioral health parity laws and other health plan requirements.
     
  • Behavioral Health Task Force at the Health and Human Services Agency: To further advance efforts to integrate behavioral health and improve parity, the administration plans to establish a Behavioral Health Task Force at the California Health and Human Services Agency, which oversees departments that provide mental and substance use treatment. Efforts to integrate behavioral and physical health are hindered by a number of limitations, such as limits on same day billing for county safety net providers, outdated cultural and linguistic standards, and the absence of statewide goals. The Task Force will review existing policies and programs to improve the quality of care, and coordinate system transformation efforts to better prevent and respond to the impacts of mental illness and substance use disorders in California’s communities.
     
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences Training Program ($10 million): In 2019, California made historical investments in adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) screenings for children and adults in the Medi-Cal program. To ensure providers are equipped to administer the screenings, the budget includes $10 million for the development of an ACEs training program, in addition to a statewide ACEs public awareness campaign. The proposal is an important step toward quality implementation of the ACES screening for children and adults in the Medi-Cal program. The proposal fails to describe the training program’s design. Cultural and linguistic considerations are lacking in the proposal, but should be a central component of the training program and public awareness campaign.  
     
  • Drug Medi-Cal Organized Delivery System ($426 million): The budget includes $426 million to support the Drug Medi-Cal Organized Delivery System, which provides expanded substance use disorder treatment for Medi-Cal beneficiaries. A total of 15 counties were expected to implement the waiver in FY 2017-18 with approximately 20 counties implementing the waiver in 2018-19. Importantly, this proposal is double the investment from last year.
     
  • Education, Prevention and Treatment of Substance Youth Disorders ($199.7 million): The cannabis excise tax is forecast to generate $479 million in 2019-20, $199.7 million of which will be allocated to education, prevention and treatment of substance youth disorders and $66.6 million to public safety-related activities. Proposition 64, the measure to legalize recreational cannabis in 2016, aimed to scale back ineffective policies of the War on Drugs and its associated systems of mass criminalization and incarceration. However, emerging research shows that many cities and counties have failed to capture and invest this new source of funds appropriately, and in many cases, served as a windfall for policy departments across the state. 
     
  • Mental Health Services for Inmates ($5.9 million):The budget includes $5.9 million to support expansion of telepsychiatry, which uses secure videoconferencing to increase inmate access to mental health care services. This expansion comes on the heels of the Governor’s approval of SB-389, which amended the Mental Health Services Act to authorize the counties to use MHSA moneys to provide services to persons who are participating in a presentencing or post sentencing diversion program or who are on parole, probation, post release community supervision, or mandatory supervision.
     
  • Prevention, Early Intervention and Treatment Services to Prevent Opioid Deaths ($89.2 million one-time): The budget continues efforts to combat opioid overdose through better prevention, early intervention, and treatment to stabilize conditions before they become severe. Specifically, the budget includes $89.2 million for the Medication Assisted Treatment Expansion Project, which aims to expand access points for individuals who need access to medications in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies. However, research indicates ongoing work is needed to address racial and ethnic disparities in programmatic outcomes.
     
  • Expanding Community Treatment of the Incompetent to Stand (IST) Trial Population ($24.6 million one-time): The budget increases funds to community alternatives to increase diversion of mentally ill offenders and decease county IST referrals to state hospitals. To advance this goal, the budget proposes to implement a six-year Community Care Collaborative Pilot program in three counties to provide incentives to treat and serve individuals deemed incompetent to stand trial (IST) in the community. This program will primarily target the development of community-based treatment options for individuals who are experiencing mental illness and are homeless.
     
  • Elimination of Dental Managed Care: The Governor’s budget proposes to eliminate Dental Managed Care (DMC) in Sacramento and Los Angeles counties with services exclusively rendered under a fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system, no sooner than January 1, 2021. Despite being in existence for many years, utilization rates remain low in Dental Managed Care. CPEHN has advocated for greater access to oral health care services, including culturally and linguistically appropriate services in Medi-Cal Dental under both Managed Care and FFS. We join other consumer advocates in urging the Administration to ensure continuity of care for those individuals transitioning between DMC and FFS and continuing to improve health outcomes in FFS dental .

Public Health & Prevention

  • Nicotine Tax: In response to the youth vaping crisis, the Governor proposes a $2 tax on every 40 milligrams of nicotine sold. This tax is to take effect on January 1, 2021. Revenues generated by this new tax will support youth prevention programs and health care workforce investments.
     
  • Behavioral Health Task Force: To prevent the long-term effects on unaddressed behavioral health conditions, Governor Newsom proposes the establishment of the Behavioral Health Task Force at the Health and Human Services Agency which will bring together stakeholders to review policies and programs that can be altered to improve patient care and curb substance use and other mental health concerns.
     
  • Safe Drinking Water (Potential $150 million per approval of the voters): Contingent upon the passage of a voter proposition, the Public Preschool, K-12, and College Health and Safety Bond Act of 2020, $150 million would be made available to support lead testing in drinking water in addition to remediation efforts.

Other Health Programs/ Early Childhood

  • Public Awareness of the Impacts of ACEs ($10 million one-time): The Governor proposes an investment of $10 million in the Office of the Surgeon General to conduct a public awareness campaign around the effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).
     
  • Office of Early Childhood Development: The Governor proposes to create the Office of Early Childhood Development to be overseen by the Health and Human Services Agency to improve program integration for California youth and is expected to be established July 1, 2021.
     
  • Department of Youth and Community Restoration: In an effort to address juvenile misconduct more holistically, the Governor proposes the creation of the Department of Youth and Community Restoration which would absorb the Division of Juvenile Justice currently overseen by the Corrections system.
     
  • Nutritious School Meals ($60 million): To improve the quality of subsidized school meals and encourage participation in the state and federal school nutrition programs, the Budget proposes $60 million to increase funding for school nutrition participation.

Specific Immigrant Programs

  • CalNEW/ California Newcomer Education and Well-Being Project ($15 million one-time): The Budget includes $15 million one-time Proposition 98 General Fund for CalNEW, to provide school-based supports for refugees and unaccompanied undocumented minors students' well-being, English-language proficiency, and academic performance as well as for immigrant families to address harms caused by the federal “public charge” rule. The funding is available over three years.
     
  • Immigration Legal Services on Community College Campuses ($10 million ongoing): The Budget includes an increase of $10 million general fund to provide legal services to immigrant students, faculty, and staff on community college campuses.
     
  • Social Entrepreneurs for Economic Development Initiative ($10 million one-time): The Budget includes $10 million one-time general fund for the California Workforce Development Board to launch the Social Entrepreneurs for Economic Development Initiative to provide micro-grants and entrepreneurial training to immigrants. (New SEED Initiative) Though we applaud the Governor’s proposal to support immigrant entrepreneurship, we expect to see greater expansion around the earned income tax credit or (EITC) for immigrants. We look forward to exploring what is possible in this budget year to achieve this end.
     
  • Dreamer Resource Liaisons ($5.8 million ongoing) The Budget includes an increase of $5.8 million ongoing general fund to fund Dreamer Resource Liaisons and student support services, including those related to career pathways and economic mobility, for immigrant students on community colleges, pursuant to Chapter 788, Statutes of 2019 (AB 1645).
     
  • Cash Assistance Program for Immigrants (CAPI) Increases: CAPI is a state-only program for immigrants who do not qualify for federal SSI/SSP cash assistance. These amounts are proposed to be increased to $943 per month for individuals and $1,583 for couples. Though we are pleased to see these augmentations in assistance, there have been no significant eligibility expansions for immigrants outside of Medi-Cal such as CalFresh. We hope that greater consideration for basic needs such as healthy food options will be considered as the budget process progresses.
     
  • California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (CLETS) ($2.8M in year one): Per the requirements of AB 1747, which limits the use of the CLETS for immigration enforcement the following funds have been earmarked—$2.8 million General Fund in 2020-21, $3.3 million in 2021-22, and $2.9 million annually thereafter to conduct investigations and audits to monitor compliance.

Human Services

  • Establishment of a Department of Early Childhood Development: The Governor proposes the creation of the Department of Early Childhood Development to improve coordination among child-serving entities. This includes fostering collaboration between the Department of Education and aligning funding streams that are geared toward supporting low-income children and families.
     
  • The Office of the Surgeon General cross sector training ($10 million one-time): Funds to the Office of the Surgeon General will be dedicated to rolling out a public awareness campaign on the dangers of adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress on the long-term health and wellness of youth into adulthood.
     
  • Establishment of the Center for Data Insights and Innovation:  This center integrates the Offices of Innovation, Patient Advocate, and Health Information Integrity in order to better align data and develop tailored approaches to responding to population health needs. CPEHN looks forward to leveraging this department to establish a Master Plan on Health Equity which would require collaboration of various healthcare focused departments to reduce the occurrences of poor health outcomes among underserved communities. 
     
  • Establishment of a Behavioral Health Task Force: This task force will be focused on improving the integration and parity of behavioral health treatment with physical health. CPEHN is concerned about the lack of access to mental health treatment that communities of color and the LGBTQ community faces. We look forward to leveraging this task force to focus on cultural competency in behavioral health.
     
  • California Access to Housing and Services Fund ($750 million initial investment): Creates a new fund with the goal of reducing street-based homelessness and increasing the number of stable housing units. It will be distributed to local entities that will assist in moving the funds. 
     
  • CALWORKs Grant increase ($73.6 million) : Proposes a 3.1% increase to the CalWORKs maximum aid payment levels effective Oct 1, 2020.
     
  • CAL Fresh ($5 million annually): Maintain the website and online application assistance tool to allow enrollment on multiple platforms and increase the number of clients.
     
  • In-Home Support Services ($14.9 billion one-time): a 16% increase in General Fund costs from the 2019-20 budget to account for expected increase caseload and other supportive programs.
     
  • Minimum wage ($1.1 billion one-time): Allocation is to support the planned increase to minimum wage to $13 per hour in Jan. 1 2020, and $14 in 2021.
     
  • Medi-Cal Expansion for Undocumented Persons Age 65 and Over ($5.9 million in General Fund): Allocation to support the increase in usage of services that come with increased coverage.
     
  • (SSI/SSP) ($2.66 billion): A %1.6 decrease from the 2019-20 budget due to a 1.8% decrease in project caseloads. An approximate increase of $13 and $20 for individuals and couple respectively to the maximum grant levels to account for CPI project growth. 

Public Safety

  • Closing a state-operated prison within the next five years: State budget reflects closing down private contracted prisons and reducing the prison inmate capacity to work towards the goal.
     
  • Youth Offender Rehabilitative and Reentry focus (6.2 million General Fund 2020-21, and $10.1 ongoing): It has been found that younger inmates are more impressionable to treatment than older inmates. A model program will be established at the Valley State Prison in Chowchilla with three budget investments: Academic Information Technology Modernization (26.9 million), Expanding Higher Education Opportunities ($1.8 million in General Fund, $3.5 million ongoing), Expanded Inmate Visitation ($4.6 million General Fund)
     
  • Inmate Medical Care and Mental Health Services ($3.6 Billion one-time): The Budget dedicates $3.6 billion General Fund for health care services programs, which provide access to mental health, medical, and dental care that is consistent with the standards and scope of services appropriate within a custodial environment.
     
  • Receiver has transitioned oversight of 19 institutions back to the state ($9.9 million General Fund in 2020-21 and $11.8 million ongoing General Fund in 2021-22): To enhance quality management and patient safety by providing staff to evaluate risks and implement best practices to improve the health care delivery system.
     
  • Support an electronic health care data exchange process to transfer health records to counties for inmates who are transitioning to county custody or the community ($722,000 ongoing General Fund): The timely sharing of electronic medical records will improve patient outcomes by allowing for enhanced continuity of care as inmates transition from prison. These improvements are intended to support the eventual full transition of medical care back to the state.
     
  • Support expansion of telepsychiatry ($5.9 million General Fund in 2020-21, increasing to $8.4 million ongoing General Fund by 2024-25): which uses secure videoconferencing to increase inmate access to mental health care services.
     
  • Contract psychiatry ($1.4 million ongoing General Fund): Required to meet a federal court order to fill at least 90 percent of the state prison system’s psychiatry positions.
     
  • Healthcare litigation assistance fund ($9 million ongoing funds ($2.2 million General Fund, $3.7 million Attorney General Antitrust Account, and $3.2 million Unfair Competition Law Fund)): To help with the upswing in healthcare litigation due to issues such as the opioid crisis, the Department of Justice will establish a Healthcare Rights and Access Section to consolidate and centralize the healthcare litigation.

Housing, Homelessness, Anti-poverty

  • Total Housing Investment ($6.8 billion one time): Across multiple departments and programs to address housing throughout the state. The housing units build goal is set at 1.2 million, with 400k built and 500k permits issued.
     
  • Climate Resilience Bond ($4.75 billion): climate resilience bond for the November 2020 ballot to support investments over the next five years to reduce specific climate risks across California through long-term investment in natural and built infrastructure, especially in the state’s most climate-vulnerable communities.
     
  • Bolster Community Power Resiliency ($50 million one‑time General Fund): In response to the size and scope of the unprecedented electric infrastructure blackouts to support additional preparedness measures.
     
  • California Access to Housing and Services Fund ($750 million one-time): Creates a new fund with the goal of reducing street-based homelessness and increasing the number of stable housing units. It will be distributed to local entities that will assist in moving the funds.
     
  • Six-year Community Care Collaborative Pilot: Program in three counties to provide incentives to treat and serve individuals deemed incompetent to stand trial (IST) in the community. This program will primarily target the development of community-based treatment options for individuals who are experiencing mental illness and are homeless.

Climate Change/Environment

  • Safe Drinking Water ($360 million bond funding): This investment will be used to provide grants and loans to disadvantaged communities to improve access to safe drinking water, including funding capital infrastructure costs for improved water supplies, treatment, and distribution to make vulnerable communities more resilient to the effects of climate change.
     
  • Hardening of Critical Community Infrastructure ($500 million bond funding): The Governor proposes funds to facilitate hardening of critical infrastructure, with a focus on low-income areas at significant risk of wildfires. Types of projects include hardening of drinking water infrastructure, emergency shelters (such as fairgrounds), and public medical facilities.
     
  • Urban Greening and Forestry ($200 million in bond funding): Funds to be dedicated to mitigate urban heat island impacts in the regions most affected by extreme heat. Funds would support urban forestry projects and an expanded urban greening program that supports the creation of green recreational parks in underserved areas.
     
  • Community Resilience Planning ($25 million bond funding):  for planning activities to address community-specific climate risks and develop climate resilience plans.

Education

K-12 Education

  • Better teachers ($350 million one-time): The budget includes a $350 million one-time General Fund to augment the Educator Workforce Investment Grant, which will support teachers and para professionals to provide special education, mental health support and intervention, support for English learners, LGBTQ students and other marginalized students, and computer science and STEM subjects.
     
  • More teachers (combined $532.1 million one-time): To address shortage of teachers in high-need areas and schools, the budget includes a $193 million one-time General Fund to address general teacher workforce shortage, a $175 million one-time General Fund to expand Teachers Residency Program, a $100 million one-time General Fund to provide stipends for teachers to complete four years of teaching services in these areas/schools, and $64.1 million one-time funding to expand the California Classified School Employees Credentialing Program.
     
  • Special Education ($250 million): The state is investing an additional $250 million (to a $645 million base) this year into pre-school age children with disabilities.
     
  • Community schools ($300 million one-time): The Budget proposes $300 million one-time General Fund to establish Community Schools to provide impoverished/disenfranchised students with wrap-around services, mental health care, restorative justice, family and community engagement, and expanded learning opportunities.
     
  • Opportunity Grants ($300 million one-time): The Budget proposes $300 million one-time General Fund to address disparities for the lowest performing schools and school districts
     
  • Computer science ($19 million one-time): About total of $19 million one-time fund in improving computer science subject outcomes.
     
  • School nutrition (combined $70 million): The Budget proposes $60 million General Fund to increase funding for school nutrition, $10 million training and education for school food service workers, and $10 million to support a farm-to-school model.
     
  • School facilities (potential $9 billion): Through a March ballot measure, potentially $9 billion to support K-12 facilities construction.

Higher Education

  • Uplifting the Central Valley Economically and Educationally ($50 million & $17 million): the Budget includes $50 million one-time General Fund to support the Fresno Developing the Region's Inclusive & Vibrant Economy (DRIVE), which includes an increase of $17 million one-time General Fund to support Fresno Integrated K-16 Education Collaborative, a plan to design educational pathways to improve social and economic mobility in the greater Fresno region.
     
  • CA Community Colleges ($83.2 million): The Budget includes $83.2 million General Fund to support apprenticeship investments; and proposes to streamline technical assistance and consolidate several programs and initiatives into a new California Community Colleges System Support Program.
     
  • California State University System: The Budget includes a five-percent increase in base resources, or $199 million ongoing General Fund, to support the CSU’s operational costs, expand CSU enrollment, and further achieve the goals of the CSU’s Graduation Initiative 2025. In addition, the Budget includes $6 million one-time General Fund to support the development or expansion of degree and certificate completion programs via the Extended and Continuing Education programs, with a focus on online programs.
     
  • University of California System ($217.7M ongoing): The Budget proposes a $217.7 million ongoing General Fund augmentation to support a five-percent General Fund increase in base resources for UC campuses and the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources; expanded enrollment and operational funding at the UC Riverside School of Medicine; service expansion for the UC San Francisco School of Medicine Fresno Branch Campus in partnership with UC Merced; the Center for Public Preparedness Multi-Campus Research Initiative; and baseline adjustments for immigrant legal services and graduate medical education. In addition to this ongoing funding, the Budget proposes $55.3 million one-time General Fund to develop a grant program for animal shelters, to support degree and certificate completion programs at UC extension centers, and to develop a UC Subject Matter Project in computer science.
     
  • Medical school ($25M ongoing): The Budget includes $25 million ongoing General Fund to expand enrollment and increase operational support for the UC Riverside School of Medicine, and $15 million ongoing General Fund to expand the UC San Francisco School of Medicine Fresno Branch Campus in partnership with UC Merced.
     
  • Degree completion ($4M one time): The Budget provides $4 million one-time General Fund to support degree and certificate completion programs at UC extension centers, with a focus on the development of online programs.
     
  • Affordability ($5M one time): The Budget includes $5 million one-time General Fund to support the convening of a student loan working group and to provide student loan outreach.

CPEHN will continue advocating for investments that prioritize the health of our most vulnerable communities. 

Stay tuned for a more in depth analysis and for more information about CPEHN's policy priorities, visit: https://cpehn.org/policy-center