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Voices for Health Equity

Voices for Health Equity

The past few weeks have been chaotic yet energizing as Congress started off the New Year with efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) along with the transition of a new Presidential Administration. Many thanks to those who have been engaged in ACA defense activities from visiting your Congressional representatives to participating in last weekend’s solidarity marches. Your voices are being heard throughout the nation!

And, there is still more work to do to defend our healthcare, protect our economic security and fight for the rights of all of our communities. CPEHN is actively engaged in the campaign to protect our health care and will be updating you with the latest ACA defense and policy developments.

Check out CPEHN’s new #ACADefenseHub to learn more about California’s #Fight4OurHealth campaign and how to get involved.

Re-Cap of ACA Repeal Efforts
Here is a quick overview of past actions:

CPEHN Rejects Trump’s Scapegoating of Immigrants, Committed to Fight Injustices

Yesterday, President Trump issued a pair of Executive Orders to further militarize our southern border and scapegoat immigrant communities. Refusing refugees, further villainizing immigrants, and building a wall serves no purpose but to sow fear, distrust, and hate.

CPEHN was founded a generation ago on a then audacious idea: that ethnic communities could come together with a unified agenda to fight against injustices. Again, we now lean our values and ideals to denounce Trump’s actions.

We embrace and defend immigrants in our communities because immigrants built our communities. We value the dignity and contributions of every person, regardless of their race, gender or religious background. And we reject these orders as discriminatory attacks against immigrants and communities of color. There are limits to the powers of the presidency. Along with our legislative leaders and legal allies, we will not hesitate to remind this Administration of the fundamental principles by which we govern an inclusive and equitable society.

CPEHN is focused and ready to resist. We remain rooted in our solidarity with all communities of color and committed as ever to advocating for social and racial justice.

On Tuesday, Congressional Senate Republicans started the process to take away health care coverage from millions of Californians. This action could result in the loss of coverage for primary care, mental health, and prevention screenings for many. The Congressional proposal focuses on reducing all or most funds for the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While specifics are not yet available, this process poses broader threats to the stability of health care for all.

“We have glimpsed the future with better health for our communities and we refuse to roll back progress. Millions of families will be forced to make tough decisions about their health and well-being if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, especially without a replacement,” said Sarah de Guia, Executive Director of the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network.

Call or Tweet Your Congress Representative!

Please help us get the message to our leaders on this final day of action to defend ACA. Tweet #Figh4OurHealth throughout the day to the following people—let’s flood their accounts! 

  • Jeff Denham  @RepJeffDenham
  • David Valadao  @RepDavidValadao
  • Devin Nunes  @DevinNunes
  • Kevin McCarthy  @kevinomccarthy
  • Jim Costa @RepJimCosta
  • Pete Aguilar  @RepPeteAguilar
  • Raul Ruiz  @CongressmanRuiz
  • Ro Khanna  @RoKhannaUSA
  • Jimmy Panetta  @JimmyPanetta
  • Salud Carbajal  @carbajalsalud
  • Nanette Diaz Barragan  @Nanette4CA
  • Lou Correa  @loucorreaCA

Sample Tweets 

The latest issue of our Health Equity Forum newsletter came out today and it includes several great articles and dozens of resources!

CPEHN’s Executive Director, Sarah de Guia, opens the newsletter reflecting on the results of the recent election and describes upcoming events and actions to protect and defend the Affordable Care Act! 

Our Ethnic Partner Spotlight features an article from the  Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF) detailing the potential effects of repeal on the Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) communities. The Asian American population in the U.S. is comparatively young, with 37 percent under the age of 26. They risk losing health insurance if repeal of the ACA includes ending the provision that allows young people to stay on their parents’ plan up to age 26. .

Covered California’s Board met on October 27, 2016 where they provided an update on the preparation for the exchange’s fourth open enrollment period. Covered California’s Executive Director, Peter Lee, acknowledged there will be higher premiums this year. However, he also noted that most exchange enrollees (87.5%) are eligible for and currently receiving financial assistance. Thus they are protected from spending more than a set share of their income on premiums. Other topics covered included an update on the new verification process for special enrollment, and re-adoption of Covered California regulations governing outreach and enrollment entities, remote identity proofing and small business eligibility and enrollment assistance. You can find a recording of the board meeting, links to the presentations, reports, proposed regulations, attachments, and other materials here.

Open Enrollment Began on November 1st!

Covered California’s fourth open enrollment period launched officially on November 1st and runs through January 31, 2017. For coverage effective on January 1, people must enroll by December 15, 2016. As always, Medi-Cal enrollment is open year-round and individuals experiencing any life transitions (losing a job or moving, among many qualifying events for special enrollment) may enroll anytime, even after January 31, 2017. 

New Marketing Efforts. Covered California has several marketing efforts planned around the new open enrollment period. The open enrollment bus tour will run from November 12-19, 2016 throughout eight cities in California to promote the need to get covered.

California’s Office of the Patient Advocate just released new 2016-17 health plan report cards to help guide and inform consumers as they shop for coverage during the open enrollment season which is set to begin: November 1, 2016.

The report cards rate California’s 10 largest HMOs, five largest PPOs and over 200 commercial medical groups on quality and patient experience. In addition, county-level ratings of medical groups with newly added cost ratings are also included. This on-line tool makes it easier for employers and consumers to make side-by side comparisons for choosing the right plan.  

What do the Report Cards Measure?

OPA uses data from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), a non-profit that that works to improve health care quality through the administration of evidence-based standards, measures, programs, and accreditation. To arrive at these ratings NCQA analyzes scores on clinical performance and patient satisfaction data.

Earlier this week in Sacramento, the California Strategic Growth Council approved $289.4 million in grants to 25 housing developments and transit-friendly infrastructure projects that aim to help reduce greenhouse gases in the communities the projects are located. The grants awarded were made available through the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program (AHSC), which is overseen by the California Department of Housing and Community Development as well as the Strategic Growth Council and the California Air Resources Board.

The AHSC Program is aimed at providing competitive grants to projects that would benefit Disadvantaged Communities through a number of criteria. The law requires half of the AHSC funding be dedicated to building affordable housing, and states that 50% percent of grants must be invested to benefit Disadvantaged Communities directly.

However, there has been ongoing discussion that the grant process does not consider objections community members may have to the proposed projects. Despite the program’s intent to support sustainable, affordable housing, some have raised concerns about displacement and gentrification caused by the new developments.

Still, the projects funded through the AHSC Program provide much needed affordable housing as well as transportation improvements that encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use that result in fewer passenger vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The reduction in VMTs will directly benefit the disadvantaged communities in which the projects are located by reducing the amount of greenhouse gases that these vulnerable populations are susceptible to.

To be [Black] in this country and to be relatively conscious, is to be in a rage almost all the time.
-James Baldwin

If you’re in a rage all the time, what does that do to your blood pressure? What does it do to your health? I was talking to my own doctor recently about my blood pressure, which is higher than either of us would like, and he was running through the various medical treatment options to lower blood pressure when I asked him, “Isn’t it possible that this crazy election with the racist Trump campaign has me really stressed out? And couldn’t that explain my high pressure?” We set another appointment for after the election, and my fingers are crossed, but the whole experience has heightened my appreciation for the health impacts of America’s racial realities.

America is coming to the realization that we are going through a demographic revolution that has profound implications for government, non-profits, businesses, media, and academia. And it also has transformative implications for our public health. Fortunately, the transformation of the racial composition of our society also provides the potential political power to pass public policies to make life better for people of all racial and cultural backgrounds.

Frustrated. Mad. Those were just two of the ways I felt as I toured the recently opened Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

It was a homecoming of sorts for me. I live in California, but I was born and raised 10 miles from the museum, in Alexandria, Va., in a black neighborhood affectionately referred to as Mudtown.

As I walked the halls of the beautifully curated museum, the exhibits brought back vivid — and painful — memories of my childhood in the early 1960s. Memories that made me angry about how much we sometimes take our hard-won rights for granted.

For decades, Virginia chose a path of massive resistance to civil rights, putting up barrier after barrier to disenfranchise its black residents. One of the state’s most effective tools was the poll tax, a shameful policy whose sole purpose was to keep people — African Americans specifically — from having a vote or a voice.

I remember eavesdropping on election-time conversations at church or around the dinner table as my parents and their friends and neighbors talked about the tax. Many said they couldn’t afford it and wouldn’t vote. Others talked about refusing to pay in a show of protest. A few advocated compliance, citing the importance of voting at any cost. But even those with money in hand were often denied the right to cast a ballot as new requirements were dreamt up to shut them out.

In general, Virginia was a tough place for black people to live back then. Not only was there a state-sanctioned campaign to keep blacks from voting, segregation was firmly entrenched. I was born in a segregated hospital. My mom was so outraged by the shoddy treatment she received that when it came time to deliver my younger siblings, she made the trek across the river to D.C., to Howard University’s Freedmen’s Hospital, founded in 1862 to aid in the medical treatment of former slaves.

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